Newsweek Topics

  • Organic Chemistry

    Newsweek

    The boom in restaurants serving local organic produce has come with an unexpected downside: more bugs in your food. Without pesticides to deter them, aphids, ladybugs, caterpillars and beetles are tagging along on the journey from farm to kitchen to dinner table with greater frequency. But the reactions among diners are as diverse as the […]

  • Vindicated Katrina Doc Tells Her Story

    Newsweek

    Dr. Anna Pou was accused of murdering nine patients in a New Orleans hospital wracked by Katrina, but a grand jury declined to indict her. Now she gives her side of the story.

  • A Law Professor on Living with Schizophrenia

    Newsweek

    Elyn R. Saks, an associate dean at the University of Southern California with triple appointments as a professor of law, psychology and psychiatry, is one of the nation’s leading experts on mental-health law. Saks has published three scholarly books and numerous journal articles, and graduated summa cum laude from Vanderbilt University, earned a master of […]

  • Dating Sites Match Lovers Who Share Disease

    Newsweek

    Dating is awkward for Sandra Liz Aquino, 41. She’s divorced and beautiful, but she’s also HIV-positive. So last month, she signed up with Prescription4Love.com, a dating Web site for people with sexually transmitted diseases and other health conditions. The site, which launched last year, is becoming a go-to spot online where singletons who also happen […]

  • Mitchell Gold on the Bible and Gay Rights

    Newsweek

    For years, Mitchell Gold, a founder of the popular furniture company Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams, has been irritated by what he sees as fundamentalist Christians’ use of the Bible to justify withholding civil rights from gays. Scripture, Gold argues, was used in the past to defend slavery, prohibit interracial marriage and prevent women from […]

  • Moms and Nannies: A Complicated Relationship

    Newsweek

    Ever since mothers were admitted to the professional classes, as a long line of books tell us, their lot has not been an easy one: they’re overworked, stressed and exhausted.

  • Q&A: How 9/11 Kids Coped With Their Loss

    Newsweek

    A new study finds that children who lost a parent on 9/11 are suffering a disproportionate share of anxiety and stress disorders.

  • Va. Tech: Counselors Discuss Trauma Management

    Newsweek

    The short-term effects are invariably similar. Anyone connected-directly or indirectly–to the ghastly killings at Virginia Tech on Monday inevitably will be grieving in the days and weeks ahead. But what about the long-term impact of exposure to the massacre? In the past, trauma counselors believed everyone exposed to events like these were at high-risk for […]

  • Study: A Downside to Day Care?

    Newsweek

    A new study finds that children who regularly attend day-care centers develop more behavioral problems in kindergarten than those that don’t. What’s a parent to do?

  • Men and Depression: New Treatments

    Newsweek

    For nearly a decade, while serving as an elected official and working as an attorney, Massachusetts state Sen. Bob Antonioni struggled with depression, although he didn’t know it. Most days, he attended Senate meetings and appeared on behalf of clients at the courthouse. But privately, he was irritable and short-tempered, ruminating endlessly over his cases […]

  • Bake It Like a Man

    Newsweek

    What do you call a goatee-wearing, bass guitar-playing, power saw-wielding, tattooed guy who spends his days mixing flour and sugar? A baker. But Duff Goldman, head of Baltimore’s Charm City Cakes and host of the Food Network’s hugely popular “Ace of Cakes” TV show is not your ordinary pastry chef. Instead of flat sheet cakes […]

  • Fast Chat: Changing Your Heart

    Newsweek

    Dr. Arthur Agatston’s first book, “The South Beach Diet,” was a best seller that turned into a national phenomenon. Now the cardiologist is back with “The South Beach Heart Program,” which aims to reduce heart attacks and strokes. He spoke with Julie Scelfo.It turns out that view is completely wrong. Instead, plaque develops like a […]

  • ‘South Beach Diet’ Doc Focuses on the Heart

    Newsweek

    The first “South Beach Diet” book in 2003 had an immediate impact on a fad-driven, weight-conscious world, but now author Dr. Arthur Agatston is back with a new book challenging America to rethink its approach to heart disease and focus on prevention.

  • Paul Martin

    Newsweek

    On September 11, 2001, Karen Ann Martin, the head flight attendant of American Airlines Flight 11, perished when her plane collided with the World Trade Center’s North Tower. But it wasn’t until this year that the New York City medical examiner identified some of her remains. Karen’s younger brother, Paul, spoke with Julie Scelfo.In October. […]

  • Science and the Gender Gap

    Newsweek

    To get a sense of how women have progressed in science, take a quick tour of the physics department at the University of California, Berkeley. This is a storied place, the site of some of the most important discoveries in modern science–starting with Ernest Lawrence’s invention of the cyclotron in 1931. A generation ago female […]

  • Heartbreak’s Revenge

    Newsweek

    When George Berg’s wife, Sandra, began spending three nights a week studying for an MBA, he didn’t mind. But when the manager of the family’s Myrtle Beach time share called two years ago to say someone left behind a Blockbuster video card–during a weekend when Sandra was supposed to be away at a company event […]

  • Autism: What Happens When They Grow Up

    Newsweek

    Chicken and potatoes. Chicken and potatoes. Danny Boronat wants chicken and potatoes. He asks for it once, twice … 10 times. In the kitchen of the family’s suburban New Jersey home, Danny’s mother, Loretta, chops garlic for spaghetti sauce. No chicken and potatoes, she tells Danny. We’re having spaghetti. But Danny wants chicken and potatoes. […]

  • Case Study: Helping Kids In Trouble

    Newsweek

    The cheerful space in Rhode Island’s Bradley Hospital could easily be mistaken for a classroom. Red sweatshirts and SpongeBob backpacks fill a row of cubbies marked with construction-paper name tags. A giant schedule of the day’s activities, including “lunch” and “story time,” hangs on a center wall, lined with yellow smiley-face cutouts to mark good […]

  • Documentary: Priest and Predator

    Newsweek

    Deliver us from Evil,” a gripping new documentary opening in theaters next week, profiles Father Oliver O’Grady, a convicted pedophile who spent 22 years molesting children in parishes throughout California, where he served as their priest. In the film, O’Grady describes his sexual attraction to boys and girls, and details how church authorities, including Roger […]

  • Blood, Guts and Money

    Newsweek

    When the first “ultimate fighters” kicked, punched and head-butted each other on national television 13 years ago, civilized observers responded with shock and disgust.

  • ‘Better to Be Safe and Wrong’

    Newsweek

    Earlier this week, a milkman named Charles Carl Roberts IV walked into a schoolhouse in Amish Pennsylvania and shot 10 young girls, killing five of them. Roberts’s wife was shocked by his behavior and told police she had no idea her husband was troubled until she discovered a suicide note that morning. Co-workers were equally […]

  • Why Girls Will Be Girls

    Newsweek

    Last week a routine casemeeting turned into a teachable moment for California neuropsychiatrist Louann Brizendine and her eight medical residents. Briz-endine, who works at the Langley Porter Psychiatric Institute in San Francisco, was listening to a resident run through a new patient’s medical history. A successful, high-functioning working mother had come in complaining of short-term […]

  • ‘It’s Better and Cheaper Than Therapy’

    Newsweek

    When Dave Nadelberg, a writer in Los Angeles, discovered unsent love letters he wrote to a girl he stalked in the 10th grade, he knew they were beseeching, pathetic …

  • Money: Did Ken Lay Take It With Him?

    Newsweek

    The former enron chief’s death raised questions about what assets he still had–and whether anyone can get their hands on them. Prosecutors are likely to drop criminal proceedings–standard procedure when a defendant dies before sentencing–but civil lawsuits will proceed, and may illuminate where Lay’s fortune went. Good news for plaintiffs: his estate (including insurance) may […]

  • Witness To Shame

    Newsweek

    As Roman Catholic bishops issued a meaculpa last week, Jehovah’s Witnesses, a cloistered group of 980,000, moved closer to facing a sex-abuse scandal of their own. In January a woman from Sacramento, Calif., filed a lawsuit charging that church leaders knowingly failed to notify civil authorities that she was raped by a member of her […]

  • Fire Up the Grill!

    Newsweek

    Bobby Flay, chef-owner of four celebrated restaurants in New York City and Las Vegas and host of the Food Network’s “Boy Meets Grill,” is known for many things: a love of barbecue, an obsession with bold flavors and superior grill proficiency. Healthful eating, however, has never been a top priority. So the title of his […]

  • Bad Girls Go Wild

    Newsweek

    When police arrived on the scene of a fatal stabbing last week in Brooklyn, N.Y., they were stunned by what they saw. The victim, an 11-year-old girl, lay crumpled on the floor, the front of her “Dora the Explorer” T shirt bloodied. The weapon, a steak knife, was in the kitchen sink. And the perpetrator, […]

  • Flying High on Four Stars

    Newsweek

    When The New York Times bestowed its fourth consecutive four-star rating on Le Bernardin earlier this month, the restaurant became one of only five in New York to win such an honor–and the only one to retain it for nearly 20 years. For chef Eric Ripert, who has been toiling in Le Bernardin’s kitchen for […]

  • For the Love of Chocolate

    Newsweek

    All his life, Jason Judkins was seeking something, but he was looking in all the wrong places, like vending machines. “Usually between 2 and 3 o’clock I’d eat a Snickers, a Three Musketeers or a Twix,” he recalls. “Then after dinner I’d have chocolate cake, or Hershey’s Nuggets, or ice cream with Hershey’s syrup.” But […]

  • 9/11 Cleanup Continues

    Newsweek

    For New Yorkers living in lower Manhattan, the abandoned, black-shrouded 40-story building across from Ground Zero has for years been a reminder of how the collapsing twin towers emitted a vast blanket of environmental contamination that may still affect nearby residents and workers. On the morning of September 11, 2001, a falling section of 2 […]