Autism: What Happens When They Grow Up

Chicken and potatoes. Chicken and potatoes. Danny Boronat wants chicken and potatoes. He asks for it once, twice … 10 times. In the kitchen of the family’s suburban New Jersey home, Danny’s mother, Loretta, chops garlic for spaghetti sauce. No chicken and potatoes, she tells Danny. We’re having spaghetti. But Danny wants chicken and potatoes. Chicken and potatoes. His 12-year-old sister, Rosalinda, wanders in to remind her mother about upcoming basketball tryouts. His brother Alex, 22, grabs some tortilla chips and then leaves to check scores on ESPN. His other brother Matthew, 17, talks about an upcoming gig with his band. Danny seems not to notice any of this. “Mom,” he asks in a monotone, “why can’t we have chicken and potatoes?” If Danny were a toddler, his behavior would be nothing unusual. But Danny Boronat is 20 years old. “That’s really what life with autism is like,” says Loretta. “I have to keep laughing. Otherwise, I would cry.”

Read more